Your Dehydrating Vegetables Headquarters!

Sliced zucchini on Nesco dehydrator

Dehydrating vegetables, whether they are fresh from the grocery store or your garden, gives you your own private stock of peas, corn, celery, potatoes, etc. on hand—all year 'round!

Don't forget you can dehydrate FROZEN vegetables too!

See the individual vegetables' page for how to dehydrate it when you click on the vegetable images coming up.


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NOTE! Below the individual vegetable images:

There's some more important information below the vegetable images:

  • How many vegetables fill four dehydrator trays
  • Ideal temperature settings to use while dehydrating your veggies
  • Vegetable preparation
  • How do I know when the vegetables are done?
dehydrating broccoli
dehydrating butternut squash
dehydrating cabbage
dehydrating carrots
dehydrating cauliflower
dehydrating celery
dehydrating corn
dehydrating garlic
dehydrating beans
dehydrating mushrooms
dehydrating onions
dehydrating peas
dehydrating peppers
dehydrating potatoes
dehydrating tomatoes
dehydrating zucchini
dehydrating broccoli
dehydrating butternut squash
dehydrating cabbage
dehydrating carrots
dehydrating cauliflower
dehydrating celery
dehydrating corn
dehydrating garlic
dehydrating beans
dehydrating mushrooms
dehydrating onions
dehydrating peas
dehydrating peppers
dehydrating potatoes
dehydrating tomatoes
dehydrating zucchini

Prep Now, Save Time Later!

When you bring your fresh veggies indoors, you can attend to them right away ... get them washed and dehydrated.

Trust me, this saves you valuable prep time in the kitchen at mealtimes later on!

You can easily throw together a very satisfying vegetable soup in less than ten minutes tops!

Now is the time to get going with dehydrating veggies – before rampant food prices take over. Dehydrating vegetables is VERY easy to do!





How Many Fresh Veggies Should I Buy
To Fill 4 Dehydrator Trays?

Click the link for a general guide on how many fresh (or frozen) veggies to buy to fill 4 dehydrator trays.

What's The Ideal Temperature
For Dehydrating Vegetables?

Most vegetables are best dehydrated between 125°F and 135°F— any hotter than that and you may cause the dehydrated vegetables to get a hard crust—known as 'case hardening' and we need to prevent this from occurring.

Case hardening prevents the inside of the vegetable from drying properly, so don't be tempted to turn the food dehydrator on high to speed up the process!

Mushrooms are the one vegetable that needs special attention. Read more about mushrooms HERE.

Some vegetables are washed, sliced, and dried with no further preparation necessary. Simply place all frozen vegetables on your dehydrator trays with no further preparation.

Please use the dehydrating vegetable clickable pictures at the top of the page for each specific vegetable.

Before opening your bag of frozen vegetables, throw the bag onto your kitchen counter-top a few times to loosen any frozen vegetables that may have frozen together in a clump!





If you have a few small persistent clumps, run the clump under cold water for a few seconds and that will fix it!

Or even easier than all that—leave the bag of frozen vegetables unopened in your kitchen sink for about an hour and they'll be good for slicing, when necessary.

Certain vegetables, like fresh carrots, need to have a generous spraying of lemon juice.

We use lemon juice as a totally acceptable substitute for ascorbic acid, which is used by professional dehydrating plants, and lemon juice works wonderfully!

Two reasons for spraying with lemon juice are to prevent the vegetables from darkening, and to prevent bacterial growth during drying.

Dehydrated Veggies are Dry When ...

... they don't stick together! While you are dehydrating veggies—and you think they are dry enough—place the veggies in airtight bags (such as Ziploc bags), and let them hang around your kitchen for a day or overnight.

This is known as conditioning and this enables the air and any moisture in the bag to distribute evenly—so that the dehydrated vegetables will be ready for vacuum sealing!

The Easy Way to
Learn How to Safely

Dehydrate Food!

Consider taking our Food Dehydrating Made Easy course over on Udemy.

Read More Good Stuff In Our Blog Posts Right Here