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Ratatouille with Dehydrated Vegetables

Ratatouille with
Dehydrated Vegetables

Ratatouille with dehydrated vegetables is a fantastic dish on its own, but serve it with rice or orzo for a satisfying lunch or dinner!

Ratatouille in a non-stick saucepan

Whether you say "rat-a-too-eee" or "ra-ta-twee" - either way it's a super-tasty dish of veggie goodness with a delicious aroma to boot!

Just look how colorful this dish is...

Guaranteed to Make Your Kitchen Smell Like You're on Vacation in Europe!

You can also devour this dish with rice, or orzo shown here.

Ingredients for Ratatouille with Dehydrated Vegetables

  • 1-1/2 cups dehydrated zucchini (or yellow squash—or combo!)
  • 1/2 cup dehydrated onion rings
  • 1/4 cup dehydrated mushrooms
  • 3 slices dehydrated elephant garlic, crumbled
  •  1 whole fresh eggplant, cubed (I leave the skin on, so wash well first)
  • 10 black olives cut in half
  • boiling water (for dehydrated items)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • salt* and pepper to taste
  • 1 14.5 oz. can small-diced tomatoes
  • 1 cup of vegetable stock
  • 1 tablespoon dried Italian Herb blend (more or less, to taste)

    NOTE: Optional Orzo, 1 cup
Ratatouille in a non-stick saucepan

How to Make Ratatouille with Dehydrated Vegetables
and Make Your Kitchen Smell Like You Live In Europe

  1. Use the freshly boiled water to rehydrate the dehydrated items above. Let sit until they have plumped up.
  2. Heat olive oil in a large saucepan, and sauté the eggplant.
  3. Pour off excess water from dehydrated veggies and add the veggies carefully to your saucepan as water can spit in hot oil.
  4. Add 1 cup of vegetable stock and add the Italian seasoning.
  5. Add the sliced olives.
  6. Add the mushrooms.
  7. Cook for 15 minutes or until the vegetables are tender.
  8. If adding the orzo, add it in step 4. You may need to add a little more boiled water too, if you find the orzo drinks up your stock too soon. Orzo only needs around 10 minutes to cook—half the time of rice. This, to me, makes this Ratatouille dish like a risotto!

*IF you need to add salt, do so, BUT be careful NOT to over-salt as the bouillon has salt in it.

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Ratatouille - ready to eat, in a big saucepanRatatouille WITH ORZO, ready to eat!

Want to Use Fresh Ingredients?

If you want to use fresh ingredients that you may have on hand, do this:

Ratatouille's fresh ingredients

Exchange the dry ingredients in the recipe, above, for these fresh ingredients listed below!

  • 2 large yellow squash or green zucchini (or one of each as a combo!) washed, peeled, and sliced
  • 1/2 large onion, peeled and diced
  • 1 cup fresh sliced mushrooms
  • 3 slices fresh elephant garlic, or 1 and 1/2 small cloves of "regular sized" garlic

Note from my hubby: "Will you cut the squash in half next time?"

My answer: Nope.

Hubby: "Can you add paprika and rosemary?"

Answer: Yep.

He also loves this ratatouille with grated cheddar cheese on top! Typical cheesy-guy thing...

ALSO: If you're adding orzo, keep an eye on the pan. Even though my saucepan is nonstick, make sure to turn the heat down low and stir/scrape the bottom while turning over the ingredients with a soft silicone scraper. Make sure your pan doesn't run overly dry (add a dash of water if that happens).


Ratatouille in a square bowlRatatouille with Orzo... yummy!

🍍 🍎 🥦 🥔  🍒 🧄

20 Taste-Tested EASY Recipes - eBook or paperback

actually, there are 26 recipes!

The recipes also include the
food ingredient amounts to use
when you have fresh food on hand!

Here's How to Make EASY
MEALS with Dried Food

Recipe Book

🍕 Pizza!      🥧  Shepherd's Pie!
🥘  Beef Stew!

plus Cauliflower Soup and
Cauliflower Mash, along
with crazy Carrot Soup!


Desserts:
Carrot Cake and
Cranberry Pineapple Pie!
and more...

🍍 🍎 🥦 🥔  🍒 🧄

Here's How to Make EASY
MEALS with Dried Food

Recipe Book

20 Taste-Tested EASY Recipes - eBook or paperback

actually, there are 26 recipes!

🍕 Pizza!
🥧  Shepherd's Pie!
🥘  Beef Stew!

plus Cauliflower Soup and Cauliflower Mash, along with crazy Carrot Soup!

Decadent Desserts:

Carrot Cake and Cranberry Pineapple Pie and more...

The recipes also include the food ingredient amounts to use when you have fresh food on hand!


As an alternative to the orzo, make some white or brown rice to serve with these vegetables.

This dish smells so good when it is cooking; it fills your kitchen with a very pleasant aroma of the Mediterranean!

Ratatouille with Orzo
Ratatouille with Rice

You can eat this just as a vegetable side dish, but with the addition of rice or orzo, it makes a complete meal.

Our family loves this ratatouille! When you've got leftover rice, remember to put some aside to make this Ratatouille with Rice.

If You're Wondering, "What is Orzo?" - Keep Reading!

a pile of riceORZO: looks yellow and is 'fatter and flatter'
a pile of riceRICE by comparison: is whiter, and looks 'slimmer'

NOTE: Orzo is a type of pasta that is shaped like a large grain of rice.

Some key facts about Orzo:

  • Orzo comes from the Italian word for "barley" - it resembles a large barley grain.
  • It is made from semolina flour or durum wheat, and sometimes eggs.
  • Orzo is commonly grown in Italy, Turkey, Greece, and other Mediterranean countries.
  • The most common variety is about 3mm in diameter, though orzo can range from 2-5mm in size.
  • Orzo has a chewy, nutty flavor and aroma similar to rice or barley.
  • It works well in soups, salads, casseroles, stir-fries, and as a side dish.

To cook Orzo:

  • Bring lightly salted water to a boil and add the orzo. Cook for 7-9 minutes until al dente.
  • Drain and rinse in a colander. From there it can be added to dishes or served on its own with oil or sauce.
  • For 1 cup dry orzo use 4 cups water or broth and salt to taste. Adjust liquid as needed.
  • For more flavor, cook orzo in broth, or tomato sauce, or infuse it with herbs.

Why Orzo Cooks Faster than Rice...

'The reason why orzo cooks faster than rice is because orzo is actually a type of pasta, while rice is its own separate grain.

Some key differences that cause the cooking time variance:

  • Pasta is made from wheat flour while rice is made from rice grains.
  • The wheat flour in pasta contains gluten, which gives it a chewy texture. Rice does not contain gluten.
  • Pasta is made with semolina or durum wheat flour which is coarser than all-purpose flour. This coarser flour helps pasta retain its shape better.
  • Rice has a higher starch content which requires more time to gelatinize and soften during cooking.
  • Pasta is dried during production which removes more moisture allowing it to cook quicker (than rice). Rice still contains its original moisture.

Wrap up: Orzo cooks faster than rice because it is made from wheat flour as a type of pasta. With properties like high gluten content, coarser flour, and low moisture, that means faster cooking times compared to rice.

The composition and production process make pasta quicker to cook than rice.

if you're into gardening...

Coming up is info. on Zucchini, Onions, and Mushrooms which are all ideal for ratatouille with dehydrated vegetables.

What Are the Different Types of Zucchini?

Different varieties of Zucchini

There are many different types of zucchini that you can grow. Some of the most popular varieties include:

  • Black Beauty
  • Costata Romanesco
  • Eight Ball
  • Golden
  • Ronde de Nice

Is Yellow Zucchini Also Known as Summer Squash?

Yes, yellow zucchini is also known as summer squash. Summer squash is a type of squash that grows on a vine and has a soft, edible skin. Summer squash can be eaten raw or cooked.

Best Areas to Grow Zucchini

Zucchini is a type of squash that grows on a vine. Zucchini can be green, yellow, or white in color. The best areas to grow zucchini are in an area with full sun and well-drained soil.

Zucchini should be watered regularly and should be fertilized every year.

When Are Zucchini Ready to Harvest?

Zucchini is usually ready to harvest in late June or early July. They can be harvested by hand or with a garden hoe.




What are the Different Types of Onions?

Four varieties of onions

There are many different types of onions that you can grow. Some of the most popular varieties include:

  • Cippolini
  • Yellow
  • Red
  • White
  • Sweet

Best Areas to Grow Onions

Onions can be grown in many different areas. The best areas to grow onions are in an area with full sun and well-drained soil. Onions should be watered regularly and should be fertilized every year.

When are Onions Ready to Harvest?

Onions are usually ready to harvest in late June or early July. Onions can be harvested by hand or with a garden hoe.




What are the Different Types of Mushrooms?

Three varieties of mushrooms

There are many different types of mushrooms that you can grow. Some of the most popular varieties include:

  • Button
  • Cremini
  • Portobello
  • Shiitake
  • Oyster

Best Areas to Grow Mushrooms

Mushrooms are a type of fungi that come in many different shapes, sizes, and colors. They can be found all over the world, growing in both natural and man-made habitats.

Mushrooms do not require complete darkness to grow, but they are typically grown in dark or dimly lit environments.

How to Grow Mushrooms

If you’re thinking about growing mushrooms, here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Choose a mushroom variety that is easiest to grow for beginners, like oyster or button mushrooms. Make sure to purchase mushroom spawn or a grow kit specific to the type you want to grow.
  • Sanitize your growing area and equipment. Mushrooms are very susceptible to contamination so it's important to sterilize any surfaces, tools, and containers you'll use. You can use a weak bleach solution, hydrogen peroxide, or isopropyl alcohol.
  • Mushrooms need a substrate to grow on. This can be anything from wood chips to straw or composted manure.
  • Introduce mushroom spawn to the substrate. Mix the spawn throughout the substrate following instructions for your variety.
  • Allow adequate airflow. Mushrooms need oxygen to grow. Avoid compacting the substrate too densely and fan or circulate air daily.
  • Mushrooms also need (some) darkness and high humidity to grow properly. A good way to create this environment is by using a plastic bag or terrarium. Some mushroom species, such as button mushrooms, require a brief exposure to light to initiate the formation of pinheads (young mushrooms). However, after this initial light exposure, they are typically grown in darkness to encourage proper development/growth.
  • Mushrooms typically take about 2-4 weeks to grow from spores to full-sized mushrooms.
  • Harvest your mushrooms when they are big enough to eat. This is typically when the caps are fully open. Pick promptly to allow new mushrooms to keep fruiting. Multiple flushes are possible from one substrate.

If you’re looking for a crop that is relatively easy to grow and can be used in many different recipes, mushrooms are a great option.

When are Mushrooms Ready to Harvest?

  • Morels: Spring (April to May)
  • Chanterelles: Summer to early fall (July to September)
  • Porcini: Summer to fall (August to November)
  • Oyster mushrooms: Year-round, but most abundant in fall and spring
  • Lion's Mane: Summer to fall (July to November)
  • Shiitake: Year-round, but most abundant in fall and spring
  • Maitake (Hen of the Woods): Fall (September to November)
  • Chicken of the Woods: Late summer to fall (August to October)
  • Black Trumpets: Summer to fall (July to October)
  • Enoki: Year-round, but most abundant in fall and winter
  • Thanks for stopping by ratatouille with dehydrated vegetables and I hope you'll cook some up soon!

    Don't forget to get your free "Six Simple Steps" eBook where I share how to dehydrate food safely!