Potato and Bacon Hash



Potato and Bacon Hash... hmm. It's great comfort food plus the aroma is divine!

Potato and Bacon Hash with cheese

This is a fun meal to make on a leisurely Sunday morning; it drives people mad with the smell of sizzling bacon...

When it's ready, I devour it with lightning speed! It's a pretty hearty meal, and it makes a great brunch–take it outside and enjoy the fresh air!

This dish will fill you up and keep you going easily until the dinner time evening meal.

You can substitute the bacon for canned corned beef, but watch the corned beef from sticking to the pan. (Check out the non-stick pans from Amazon below).

Ingredients for Potato and Bacon Hash

  • 1-1/2 cups dehydrated potatoes, sliced
  • 1/4 cup dehydrated onion
  • 2 slices dehydrated elephant garlic
  • 4 slices bacon (or 2 oz. corned beef, or ham) 
  • 1 tablespoon plain flour 
  • 2 tablespoons tomato ketchup
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce 
  • 4 oz. grated cheddar cheese
  • 1/4 cup cold water
  • salt and pepper to taste

How to Make Potato and Bacon Hash—One Bowl is NEVER Enough

We Brits pronounce Worcestershire like this: wus-ter-sher :-)

  1. In a large saucepan, add the dehydrated sliced potatoes, onion, and elephant garlic. Add boiling water to cover them all. Let them rehydrate in the pan; add more boiling water if necessary.
  2. Fry up the bacon!
  3. While the bacon is cooking, combine the flour and water in a measuring jug, add the ketchup and Worcestershire sauce, and set aside.
  4. When the potato mix is sufficiently re-hydrated (and remember, the potatoes are already cooked prior to dehydrating so they only need to be heated through), add the ketchup mix and gently stir and cook a few minutes more.
  5. Add the bacon, crumbled (or any other flavorful meat, i.e. canned corned beef*).
  6. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  7. Sprinkle on about 4 oz. grated cheddar cheese, let it melt and serve!


*You can substitute the bacon for canned corned beef, but watch the corned beef from sticking to the pan.

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Want to Use Fresh Ingredients?

If you want to use fresh ingredients that you may have on hand, do this:

Garlic, onions, potatoes

Exchange the dry ingredients in the recipe, above, for these fresh ingredients listed below!

  • 3 to 4 large potatoes, washed, peeled and sliced, and pre-cooked
  • 1/2 large onion, peeled and diced
  • 2 slices fresh elephant garlic, or 1 and 1/2 small cloves "regular sized" garlic

potato-cakes-in-pan2-685w.webp

Tasty Leftovers...

Leftovers? Shape a couple of spoonfuls each into several flat burger-shaped patties. Lightly flour them, and place gently in a pre-oiled hot pan.

Let them sit so they get a crust, then flip them over carefully. Folks enjoy this meal with a dash of tomato ketchup and seasoned scrambled eggs!


🍍 🍎 🥦 🥔  🍒 🧄

20 Taste-Tested EASY Recipes - eBook or paperback

actually, there are 26 recipes!

The recipes also include the
food ingredient amounts to use
when you have fresh food on hand!

Here's How to Make EASY
MEALS with Dried Food

Recipe Book

🍕 Pizza!      🥧  Shepherd's Pie!
🥘  Beef Stew!

plus Cauliflower Soup and
Cauliflower Mash, along
with crazy Carrot Soup!


Desserts:
Carrot Cake and
Cranberry Pineapple Pie!
and more...

🍍 🍎 🥦 🥔  🍒 🧄

Here's How to Make EASY
MEALS with Dried Food

Recipe Book

20 Taste-Tested EASY Recipes - eBook or paperback

actually, there are 26 recipes!

🍕 Pizza!
🥧  Shepherd's Pie!
🥘  Beef Stew!

plus Cauliflower Soup and Cauliflower Mash, along with crazy Carrot Soup!

Decadent Desserts:

Carrot Cake and Cranberry Pineapple Pie and more...

The recipes also include the food ingredient amounts to use when you have fresh food on hand!


potatoes-in-basket2-685w.webp

How to Grow Potatoes

Here are some tips on growing potatoes and the best places in the US to grow them:

Growing Potatoes

  • Choose a sunny spot with nutrient-rich, well-draining soil. Amend soil with compost or manure.
  • Cut seed potatoes into pieces with at least 2 eyes per piece. Let pieces dry for 1-2 days before planting.
  • Dig trenches or holes about 8 inches deep. Space seed potatoes 12-18 inches apart in rows 2-3 feet apart.
  • Cover pieces with 4 inches of soil, leaving some eyes/sprouts exposed. Add more soil as plants grow.
  • Potatoes need consistent moisture. Water thoroughly when top few inches of soil are dry.
  • Hill soil up around stems as they grow to prevent sunlight from turning tubers green.
  • Harvest potatoes when plants start to die back. Carefully dig around stems using a fork.

Best Places to Grow Potatoes in the US

  • Pacific Northwest - Mild summers and abundant rainfall in states like Idaho, Oregon, and Washington make ideal potato growing conditions.
  • Northern Midwest - Cool climates and fertile loam soils in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota are great for potatoes.
  • Northeast - Maine, New York, and Pennsylvania offer four distinct seasons to support potato growth cycles.
  • Central/Southern High Elevations - Higher elevations in Colorado, New Mexico, and North Carolina provide cooler temps needed for potatoes.
  • Alaska - Extensive daylight in summer helps Alaska's potato crops bulk up. Matanuska Valley is a top region.

With the right climate and care, most regions can produce successful backyard potato harvests. Pay attention to each variety's specific needs for best results!

Battling Beetles and Blights: Managing Common Potato Pests

Some common pests that can hinder potato growth and ways to manage them include:

  • Potato Beetles - These insects eat leaves and stems. Handpick adults and larvae off plants. Use insecticidal soaps or neem oil sprays.
  • Aphids - These tiny sucking insects stunt growth. Blast off with water. Apply insecticidal soaps or neem oil. Attract beneficial insects like ladybugs.
  • Potato Blight - This fungal disease turns leaves brown and spotted. Improve air circulation and avoid wetting foliage. Remove and destroy severely infected plants.
  • Wireworms - Larvae bore into tubers making tunnels. Solarize soil before planting to reduce populations. Avoid planting in areas with high grasses.
  • Nematodes - Microscopic worms stunt root growth. Rotate crop locations. Plant resistant varieties. Solarize soil using clear plastic tarps.
  • Voles - These rodents eat away roots and tubers. Use physical barriers like hardware cloth around plants. Eliminate hiding spots. Employ traps as necessary.
  • Colorado Potato Beetle - Adults and larvae devour foliage. Hand-pick or shake pests into soapy water. Cover young plants with fabric row covers.

Don't forget to get your free "Six Simple Steps" eBook where I share how to dehydrate food safely!