Dehydrating Corn ~ From Fresh or Frozen!

Delicious Corn and Corn Chowder

Let's get busy dehydrating corn—easily accomplished by using bags of frozen corn! Corn is great for vegetable soups and stews, fritters, or as a corn chowder and you can grind it into cornmeal!





Enjoy Fiber-Rich Corn on the Cob!

Frozen corn has got to be right up there with frozen peas for ease of dehydrating! There's no excuse for not dehydrating these fantastic vegetables...

Corn Nutrition Info.

Corn on Nesco dehydrator tray

Frozen off-the-cob corn is a substantial source of vitamin A, followed by Choline, vitamin C, and Niacin. There are trace amounts of vitamin E, Thiamine, Riboflavin, Pantothenic Acid, and Folate.





In the mineral department, frozen corn is a good source of Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, followed by Calcium, and Iron. There are trace amounts of Zinc Manganese, Copper, and Fluoride.

Frozen corn contains Omega-3 fatty acids and a high amount of Omega-6 fatty acids too!

Corn is rich in starch and dietary fiber—and the fiber is good news for a stubborn digestive system.

Dehydrating Corn ~ The EASY Way!

Dehydrated corn in bowl

Let's get busy dehydrating corn. The instructions for FROZEN corn is shown below. Remember, we're all about "the easy" here!

Instructions for FRESH corn are a couple of paragraphs farther down this page in a green box.

  1. Toss your frozen bag of corn kernels on the countertop a few times to loosen the kernels
  2. Arrange the frozen corn on your food dehydrator trays, making sure there's some space for breathing room!
  3. Turn on your food dehydrator and set the temperature between 125°F and 135°F (or per your food dehydrator's instructions).
  • Dehydrated corn will be brittle when fully dried.
  • Drying time: between 6-12 hours.
  • Please remember to rotate your trays for even drying.

Dehydrating Fresh Corn

For those of you with fresh corn, simply husk and wash them. Get a pan of water boiling and steam the ears for 4-5 minutes. Get them into cold water as soon as possible to stop the cooking process.

Next, cut the corn off the cob by standing the ear on its end, and slice downwards from the top to cut off the kernels. Make sure you get the whole kernel and not tons of stalk!

Now follow the instructions from Step 2 onward in the frozen corn instructions.

Fresh corn takes around 12-15 hours when fully dehydrated. It will be brittle and very hard. 

Is Corn Easy to Grow?

Corn is a type of cereal grain that is popular in many cuisines. It can be eaten on its own, used as an ingredient in other dishes, or even processed into corn oil or cornstarch.

Corn is relatively easy to grow, and it’s a great crop for beginner gardeners. It’s also a very versatile crop, as it can be grown in a variety of climates and soil types.

If you’re thinking about growing corn, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Corn needs full sun and well-drained soil to grow properly.
  • It’s best to start corn seeds indoors in pots about 6-8 weeks before the last frost date.
  • When transplanting corn seedlings to the garden, be sure to space them out evenly. Each plant should have about 2 feet of space all around it.
  • Corn is a heavy feeder, so be sure to fertilize your plants regularly.
  • Water your corn plants regularly, especially during dry periods.
  • Harvest your corn when the ears are ripe. This is typically about 2-3 months after planting.

If you’re looking for a crop that is easy to grow and versatile, corn is a great option. It’s a delicious addition to any meal.

What Fertilizer Does Corn Need?

Corn is a heavy feeder, so it needs plenty of fertilizer to grow properly. The best fertilizer for corn is a balanced fertilizer with an NPK ratio of 10-10-10.

Apply fertilizer to your corn plants when they are about 6 inches tall. Then, apply additional fertilizer every 4-6 weeks throughout the growing season.

When applying fertilizer, be sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Applying too much fertilizer can damage your plants.

squirrel eating corn off the cobUsed by Permission / Canva registered user

Cute Corn Story

I was chatting with a resident gardener the other day. We were talking about squirrels and that reminded him of the day he couldn't believe one of my neighbors were actually growing corn in their tiny back garden.

He asked them about their 'corn growing' and they were shocked to see the corn stalks. They hadn't planted it. And they hadn't even noticed it because they're 'snowbirds' and had just arrived back in town!

Apparently, before they left town, they'd been feeding the squirrels out back with leftover corn cobs from dinner. The squirrely-squirrels took those cobs and buried them!

Hence the nice batch of corn ears a few months later!

corn in a fieldUsed by Permission / Canva registered user

How Long Does it Take for Corn to Grow?

Corn typically takes about 2-3 months to grow from seed to harvest. This can vary depending on the variety of corn you’re growing and the growing conditions.

If you’re looking for a quick-growing crop, choose a variety of corn that matures in about 60 days. For a slower-growing crop, choose a variety that matures in about 90 days.

What is the Best Way to Plant Corn?

Corn is best planted in rows that are about 30 inches apart. Each seed should be planted about 1 inch deep and 2-3 inches apart. (Tell *that* to the squirrels, huh?)

If you’re planting more than one row of corn, space the rows about 3 feet apart. This will give the plants plenty of room to grow.

When should I Harvest my Corn?

You’ll know your corn is ready to harvest when the ears are ripe. This is typically 2-3 months after planting.

To test if your corn is ready, peel back a few of the outer leaves and check the kernels. They should be plump and firm.

If they’re not quite ready, leave the ears on the plants and check them again in a few days.

And when you've got leftovers? Skip the squirrels—dehydrating corn is the way to go!


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