dehydrated potato beaded necklace

Necklace By Janetta

Article 13
Dehydrated Potato
Beaded Necklace

Article 13
Dehydrated Potato
Beaded Necklace

In November of 2012, a lovely lady named Janetta wrote to me to ask about dehydrating potatoes for stringing into necklaces!

Well, to be honest, I didn't know a thing about it, so Janetta promised to try her hand with the necklaces and send in some pictures too.

She doesn't have a dehydrator, so she used the oven, set at 170°F for two hours and left them in the oven until the next day.

"They Turned Out Like Rocks!"

"They Turned Out
Like Rocks!"

Janetta says "they turned out like rocks but I guess that isn't bad!" She also noted that she should have cut the potatoes into larger pieces (even though she did consider shrinkage), they did dry too small, in her opinion.

Janetta also thinks that the beads were too small and some got lost in the potato indentations!

Still, it was her first try and she and her friends were pleased with the effort.





dehydrated potato beaded necklace

Even Lovelier ... the
Second Time Around

Fast forward to today, March 12, 2013, and Janetta sent two more lovely photos of her beads. This batch of beads were dried at 200°F for three hours, and were made from three large potatoes. Janetta ended up using a skewer to make the holes!

Use a Skewer to Make Holes!

Use a Skewer
to Make Holes!

"They are like rocks and hard to force holes after they are baked," says Janetta, and she reminds us to make sure the holes are big prior to dehydrating.

I asked her what she painted them with. "I painted them with turquoise acrylic paint and I intend to put some kind of sealer on them."



dehydrated potato beaded necklace

Aren't They Pretty?

To add decoration and spacing between the turquoise spuds(!) she strung them with silver beads on nylon jewelry cord. She said the nylon cord was stiff enough that she didn't need to use a needle.

While Janetta fully intended to make one strand long enough to drop over her head, the strings were too short this time around. "This was a two-day process," says Janetta. "I could have put two beads in between each potato but didn't think of it at the time.

It took a long time to paint them!" she added.

Thank you Janetta for sharing your dehydrated potato and bead necklaces with us!

www.easy-food-dehydrating.com
Copyright© March, 2013








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