Article 17
After Armageddon

A Follow-up to the Ebola Article

I watched a two-hour show titled 'After Armageddon' which my husband had the DVR record on Dish channel 121 - the H2 Channel, More 2 History. This article is a follow-up to the Ebola article I posted last month.

The original air date of the show was November 15, 2009. Back then, the show would have seemed far-fetched, I'm sure – striking fear in most people (as it should, but not in a thrill-seeking sick-kick way). The show's main characters are a paramedic and his wife, and their young son. They lived in California in the suburbs. Then the super-virus hits. Big time.

The hospitals quickly fill up with patients clamoring for attention, but the staff is overwhelmed not only by the mass amount of folk seeking medical attention, but they succumb to the virus themselves – leaving the hospital(s) severely understaffed.

As the paramedic roamed the hospital stepping around barely-breathing sick people, one patient asked if he was a doctor. The paramedic thought for a few seconds, and said "no." Why? He knew that if he said he was a paramedic, the sick people would be all over him like a rash ... begging for medicine (that wasn't available anyway).





Surgical Team

Article 17
After Armageddon

A Follow-up to the Ebola Article

Surgical Team

I watched a two-hour show titled 'After Armageddon' which my husband had the DVR record on Dish channel 121 - the H2 Channel, More 2 History. This article is a follow-up to the Ebola article I posted last month.

The original air date of the show was November 15, 2009. Back then, the show would have seemed far-fetched, I'm sure – striking fear in most people (as it should, but not in a thrill-seeking sick-kick way). The show's main characters are a paramedic and his wife, and their young son. They lived in California in the suburbs. Then the super-virus hits. Big time.

The hospitals quickly fill up with patients clamoring for attention, but the staff is overwhelmed not only by the mass amount of folk seeking medical attention, but they succumb to the virus themselves – leaving the hospital(s) severely understaffed.

As the paramedic roamed the hospital stepping around barely-breathing sick people, one patient asked if he was a doctor. The paramedic thought for a few seconds, and said "no." Why? He knew that if he said he was a paramedic, the sick people would be all over him like a rash ... begging for medicine (that wasn't available anyway).

Create A Vaccine "In Time"?

Create A Vaccine
"In Time"?

The narrators posed the question of "Can a vaccine be created in time, and in the quantity necessary?" Probably not is my answer and theirs.

After masses around the world die of this (unnamed) virus on After Armageddon, bodies are just left where they died; there are no sanitation workers to remove said bodies en-masse. Next, the power grid fails due to the deaths of the workers who keep the power plants running ... and the threat of Nuclear plant meltdowns.

Nine Meals Away From Anarchy

That's It. Three Days.

The average grocery store can feed its townspeople for three days. The average Joe and Josephine at home have three to seven days of food available.

(If you're a fan of Easy Food Dehydrating, then YOU will of course have much more socked away to take care of your family and loved ones). The survivors – having fled the cities – formed gangs, armed and ready to kill for food as they roamed the suburbs.

A good point by the narrator in this scene was if you want to "sit it out" then try to make your home look like it's already been ransacked. The paramedic threw out clothing and odds and ends on his front lawn in an effort to match the surrounding houses' post-burglary gardens – any marauding gangs would think your home has already been burgled and would move on. At this time, his wife thought he'd gone mad – tossing out clean laundry in the front yard. As if dirty laundry would have made the situation more bearable? It's amazing how the human brain comes up with odd-ball stuff in high-pressure situations.



Abandoned Building - After Armageddon

Nine Meals Away
From Anarchy

That's It. Three Days.

Abandoned Building - After Armageddon

The average grocery store can feed its townspeople for three days. The average Joe and Josephine at home have three to seven days of food available.

(If you're a fan of Easy Food Dehydrating, then YOU will of course have much more socked away to take care of your family and loved ones). The survivors – having fled the cities – formed gangs, armed and ready to kill for food as they roamed the suburbs.

A good point by the narrator in this scene was if you want to "sit it out" then try to make your home look like it's already been ransacked. The paramedic threw out clothing and odds and ends on his front lawn in an effort to match the surrounding houses' post-burglary gardens – any marauding gangs would think your home has already been burgled and would move on. At this time, his wife thought he'd gone mad – tossing out clean laundry in the front yard. As if dirty laundry would have made the situation more bearable? It's amazing how the human brain comes up with odd-ball stuff in high-pressure situations.

Water and Food

We all know that water is more important than food in a crisis like this, but we also all know that we do NOT have enough water stored in our own homes.

Earlier, I touched upon the lack of electricity ... sewers backed up (no electric pumps); food in freezers and refrigerators obviously spoiled; there was no TV or cellphone communications. It was grim. The paramedic and his wife and son packed their SUV with as much food and water and necessary clothing and important papers/ID and "got the hell out of Dodge."

It was not an easy exit from suburbia; gangs posing as The National Guard lay in waiting to steal everything and anything from vehicles that were trying to escape. The family did make it out unharmed and wanted to head to Idaho.

As they were driving they came across a guy who was sat on the ground, his back leaning against the front wheel of his vehicle.

He had been either shot or hit (not fatally) in the head, and the paramedic pulled over and attended to his head wound – but knew that he had to "move on." He wished the guy well. Shortly thereafter, while the family were out of their vehicle looking for food and water in the shrubs, the family's SUV was taken away from them by gangs, so they had to continue their journey to Idaho on foot.

There were no cooling 80°F shore breezes - it was a hot 90-105°F. The gang took all they had, so it was necessary to forage for food and water along the way. They came across a small farmhouse – the owner was lying dead outside the door. The family managed to find some life-saving water.

A while later, the very same guy that had the wounded head was driving to town and came across the paramedic and his wife and son as they were walking to Idaho. He took them all with him in his car to his town.


Easy Food Dehydrating & Safe Food Storage

Fast-Forward Eighteen Months

The virus had burned itself out, and the survivors banded together. Feeling incredibly lucky to be alive, there was a strong return to a belief in God – that they had been saved and blessed.

These small groups of survivors had a 'City Mayor' and their small town's entrance and exit roads were manned with armed members of the group. No new wanderers were allowed in. Those that did trespass with an obvious intent to steal and kill for food, were shot dead – in front of the townsfolk. Law and order.

They grew their own food. After harvest, (and this is my favorite part) the townsfolk took to dehydrating their fruits and vegetables. How? They used abandoned vehicles. They used racks taken from electric ovens and placed their sliced fruits and vegetables on these racks, and placed them inside the vehicles and closed the doors. The sun's heat dried out their harvest effectively so they could sustain the town during the long winter months.


Grave marker

Fast-Forward
Eighteen Months

The virus had burned itself out, and the survivors banded together. Feeling incredibly lucky to be alive, there was a strong return to a belief in God – that they had been saved and blessed.

These small groups of survivors had a 'City Mayor' and their small town's entrance and exit roads were manned with armed members of the group. No new wanderers were allowed in. Those that did trespass with an obvious intent to steal and kill for food, were shot dead – in front of the townsfolk. Law and order.

Grave marker

They grew their own food. After harvest, (and this is my favorite part) the townsfolk took to dehydrating their fruits and vegetables. How? They used abandoned vehicles. They used racks taken from electric ovens and placed their sliced fruits and vegetables on these racks, and placed them inside the vehicles and closed the doors. The sun's heat dried out their harvest effectively so they could sustain the town during the long winter months.

In Conclusion — After Armageddon

The neighborhood towns were self-sufficient; old-folk died (the paramedic too as he'd cut his hand; no antibiotics were available). His son, later married with his own child, visited his father's grave.

All through the show the paramedic's son shot video with his video-cam. The show ends with the son looking at the video he took many years earlier which to me was an obvious technological clash with the sparse living arrangements.

(Not sure how he made the video camera work ... batteries recharged or had spares? Show post-production error?)

Anyway - I got the point. The neighborhoods had reverted to pioneering times (no choice!) where all banded together to help each other.

Each found a skill-set.

Times were tough.

Fields were plowed by man - not great big lumbering tractors anymore.

There was no diesel fuel to run them.

Plowed Field

In Conclusion —
After Armageddon

The neighborhood towns were self-sufficient; old-folk died (the paramedic too as he'd cut his hand; no antibiotics were available). His son, later married with his own child, visited his father's grave.

Plowed Field

All through the show the paramedic's son shot video with his video-cam. The show ends with the son looking at the video he took many years earlier which to me was an obvious technological clash with the sparse living arrangements.

(Not sure how he made the video camera work ... batteries recharged or had spares? Show post-production error?)

Anyway - I got the point. The neighborhoods had reverted to pioneering times (no choice!) where all banded together to help each other.

Each found a skill-set.

Times were tough.

Fields were plowed by man - not great big lumbering tractors anymore.

There was no diesel fuel to run them.

I'm not going to say that the older people were happier – but the kids growing up this way didn't know any different – but the older folk knew of a time and place where electricity ran all kinds of fancy gadgets; food was stacked on shelves in grocery stores, canned goods lined pantry shelves in kitchens. It became a myth in their minds.

Actually, the townsfolk were content. The few laws that existed were followed. Times were simpler.

They attended church.

They talked to one another.

They got along.

They survived.

www.easy-food-dehydrating.com
Copyright© November, 2014


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Keep YOUR Food Pantry FULL!

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for any reason or season!
Our 6-part email series will arrive
in your inbox every three days
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